Archives for November 2017

How to compare software developers based on methodology

Written by Eban Escott, Ph.D., CEO of WorkingMouse

When it comes time to choosing the right software developer or development team for your project, there is more to consider than simply comparing an hourly rate.  There are many factors that come into play, not least the choice between onshore and offshore developers.

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What is a Mareva Order?

A Mareva order (Mareva Order), also known as a freezing order or asset protection order, is a special type of interlocutory injunction which restrains a defendant from dealing with the whole or part of their assets pending the outcome of legal proceedings.  In preventing a defendant from disposing of their assets in a way which may deprive the plaintiff of an effective remedy, Mareva Orders are a tool to prevent an abuse of court processes and protect the proper administration of justice.  In Queensland, Mareva Orders are dealt with in Chapter 8 Part 2 Division 2 of the Uniform Civil Procedure Rules 1999 (Qld) (UCPR). [Read more…]

Is the use of a trade mark in AdWords an infringement?

The concept of ‘Googling’ has become a part of everyday life.  But does anyone ever stop to think how Google results are collated?  In the case of Veda Advantage Limited v Malouf Group Enterprises Pty Limited [2016] FCA 255 (Veda Advantage case) one company did just that, and they were not happy with the answer.  The case concerned the use of registered trade marks as keywords and in the title tags and descriptions of sponsored link advertising in the Google AdWords program. [Read more…]

Take care when alleging patent infringement

A patent entitles the holder to exploit the invention disclosed in the patent to the exclusion of all others (unless authorised by the holder of the patent).  Where the patent holder is made aware of the use of their invention by another who is not authorised to do so, they may commence patent infringement proceedings to recover the loss sustained because of the infringement.  It is important for patent holders to be aware of the provisions rules regarding making unjust threats of patent infringement.  The recent decision in Mizzi Family Holdings Pty Ltd v Morellini (No 3) [2017] FCA 870 provides an example of how the Court considered an unjust threat of patent infringement and the damages that may be payable by the maker of such threats. [Read more…]

What is an end user licence agreement?

An end user licence agreement (EULA) is a contract between two or more parties based on the proprietary rights of a licensor to grant a right to the licensee/s to use or access a product or service.  The proprietary right may be based on a variety of intellectual property (IP) rights, including copyright, trade marks, patents, designs and trade secrets.  EULAs are common in the software and web development industries, where copyright subsists in the written code of a program or website as a literary work in under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). [Read more…]

Federal Court rules on unfair contract terms

The recent decision of the Federal Court of Australia in Australian Competition and Consumer Commission v JJ Richards & Sons Pty Ltd [2017] FCA 1224 serves as a reminder to businesses that use standard form contracts to carefully review their terms.

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Infringement of copyright in computer code

Computer code, like other literary works are automatically protected by copyright.  Subject to exceptions, only the copyright owner has the exclusive right to reproduce a literary work in which copyright subsists, pursuant to section 31 of the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) (Act).   Generally the reproduction of another programmer’s code without their consent amounts to an infringement of copyright – section 36 of the Act.
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Discovery in the Federal Court of Australia

On 1 August 2011 the Federal Court of Australia (Federal Court) adopted the Federal Court Rules 2011 (Cth) (Rules) and its revised regime for discovery.  The Federal Court does not require parties to provide disclosure as a matter of course.  Instead, if a party wishes to receive documents from another party (or a third party), they must seek the Court’s permission.  This process is known as discovery.  The Rules are to be read in conjunction with the associated Federal Court practice notes, relevantly Central Practice Note: National Court Framework and Case Management (CPN-1) and Intellectual Property Practice Note (IP-1).  In this article, we consider the process of seeking discovery of documents in a matter before the Federal Court. [Read more…]

Patents, grace periods and revocation – how does it all work?

The registration of a patent entitles the owner to protection of their invention under the provisions of the Patents Act 1990 (Cth) (Act).  In order to qualify for these protections, the invention must pass the tests for patentability set out in the Act.  Part of these tests require that the invention must be new, with the Act distinguishing between patents based on their ‘inventiveness’ or ‘newness’; between standard patents and innovation patents.  Regardless of this distinction, a patent will not be granted where the invention is known to the public through prior use or disclosure of the invention.  In this article, we consider the implication of disclosure of an invention prior to application and the effect of the ‘grace periods’ on revocation. [Read more…]

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