Search Results for: EU

Force majeure in a major pandemic

To say the world has been turned upside down is all but literally true in many respects.  Where there is the slightest sneeze of Covid-19, governments have made shut down decisions that that have impacted the ability of businesses to operate and perform their contractual obligations.

A feverous question is whether COVID-19 an event of force majeure and does it relieve the affected party from its obligations?  Below we set out the issues. [Read more…]

EU General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) – How to comply

Similar to the Australian Privacy Principles (APP) as set out in the Australian Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (Privacy Act), the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) ‘lays down rules relating to the protection of natural persons and the processing of their personal data.’  The GDPR came into force on 24 May 2016 and became binding on all European Union (EU) member states on 25 May 2018. [Read more…]

Selling into the EU – what do the cookie laws mean for your website?

In May 2012, the United Kingdom’s statutory adoption of the  European Union (EU’s) Cookie Laws came into force.  The effect of the law is that website operators must obtain the express consent for a cookie to be saved and used on a users computer.  The law applies to organisations that host websites from within the EU and also to organisations based in the UK that host outside the jurisdiction.

[Read more…]

Non-fungible tokens – the new way to own IP?

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) have been making headlines recently for being sold at auction for enormous sums of money.  Business school drop-out turned American DJ, 3LAU, apparently sold his NFT collection just over a month ago for $11.6 million USD ($15 million AUD).[1]  Grimes, otherwise known as Claire Boucher, a prominent musician and partner to Tesla CEO, Elon Musk, sold multiple digital artworks amounting to a total of $6 million USD ($7.79 million AUD).[2]

So what are NFTs and how can they help you protect your intellectual property (IP)? [Read more…]

Explaining the Media Bargaining Code

On 18 February 2021, social media company Facebook made the decision to prohibit the publishing and sharing of links (Links) from Australian media companies (News Companies) on the site.  This ban came into effect almost immediately after the Treasury Laws Amendment (News Media and Digital Platforms Mandatory Bargaining Code) Bill 2021 (Cth) (Media Bargaining Code) passed the House of Representatives.  The ban has roadblocked News Companies from 9 News to the Bureau of Meteorology and even the beloved satirical news provider, The Betoota Advocate.  This article analyses the proposals of the Media Bargaining Code and what the legal effect of non-compliance may be. [Read more…]

What is the springboard doctrine?

The ‘springboard’ doctrine refers to the benefit that is derived because of misuse of confidential information by a defendant that enables them to ‘springboard’ a new product or service to market more rapidly than if they had used their own mind.  A breach can be a contractual or equitable in nature and can also involve other causes of action such as breaches of director’s duties. [Read more…]

Deal fatigue in business transactions

Deal fatigue is very common in commercial transactions in Australia because of the complexity of the law and the sheer volume of documentation that’s often required.  An unfortunate consequence can be that benefit of entering into the deal in the first place can be watered down to the extent that the deal becomes unpalatable.   This article will discuss the symptoms of deal fatigue and offer some tips on avoiding it. [Read more…]

Warning – Facebook trolls ordered to pay $150k damages

In the recent unreported case of Moy v Isaac & Smith, featured in an article published by the Courier Mail on 15 November 2020, two online trolls were ordered to pay $150,000 to a wedding planner after creating a number of defamatory Facebook posts about her business. [Read more…]

Directions to rectify defective domestic building work – part 2

Under the Queensland Building and Construction Commission Act 1991 (Act) the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) is empowered to issue to a builder a notice to rectify defective domestic building work. [Read more…]

Proposed amendments to use of orphan works

On 13 August 2020, Paul Fletcher MP, Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts, announced amendments to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) (Act).  The amendments follow two (2) years of stakeholder consultation, and finalise the Government’s response to the Productivity Commission’s 2016 Intellectual Property Arrangements Report.  The reforms focus on the use of “orphan works”, with an aim to provide a framework for copyright that is fit for the digital age. [Read more…]

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