Software litigation – how much evidence is enough?

Litigation involving software commonly involves allegations of copyright infringement and breaches of contractual obligations of confidence.  However, without an “anton pillar” style order, it can be challenging to substantiate the extent of any alleged breach due to the technological nuances involved with properly analysing available evidence.   This make it difficult for the plaintiff to decide whether or not to initiate legal proceedings against an infringing party.  In circumstances where a prospective applicant does not have complete access to the source code, it may be desirable to make an application for discovery prior to the start of proceedings pursuant to Rule 7.23 of the Federal Court Rules 2011 (Cth) (Rules). [Read more…]

Has my software been copied? – the legal test

There is an urban myth that something can be copied and changed by 20% or so and then there is no copyright infringement.   Rightly or wrongly this is simply untrue.  In the case of IPC Global Pty Ltd v Pavetest Pty Ltd (No 3) [2017] FCA 82 (IPC Global), a former employee of the applicant copied source code and passed it to a developer.  It was subsequently alleged that in doing so, the respondent had breached a contractual obligation of confidence and had also breached the applicant’s copyright. [Read more…]

Privacy Awareness Week 2019 – 12-18 May 2019

During  Privacy  Awareness  week  2019 Australian businesses  are  reminded  they  are  entrusted  with  certain  responsibilities  pursuant  to  the  Privacy  Act  1988  (Cth) (Privacy  Act).    In  particular  the  way  they  collect,  store  and  disclose  the  personal  information  of  their  customers. [Read more…]

De-encryption laws to make tech giants cooperate with law enforcement

Updated 4 October 2018 – see De-encryption De-encryption Bill currently before Joint Committee

According to the ABC website, in the next few weeks Cyber Security Minister Angus Taylor is poised to present new legislation which once passed will require technology companies and multinationals to assist law enforcement to access encrypted data of “suspected criminals and terrorists”.  Currently, the bill is not yet before parliament but should appear on its website once officially announced.

In February, the government has indicated its plans to tackle criminal use of encryption with the Honourable Peter Dutton MP stating in an address to the National Press Club:

“Law enforcement access to encrypted communications should be on the same basis as telephone and other intercepts,
in which companies provide vital and willing assistance in response to court orders.”
[Read more…]

What is a data breach response plan and how do I get one?

On 23 February 2018 the notifiable data breach scheme (Scheme) was enacted, through legislation amending the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (Privacy Act), making it mandatory for certain (eligible) entities to notify affected individuals about eligible data breaches.  In talking to clients in this area, there appears to be some confusion about what an eligible organisation has to do to prepare for this. [Read more…]

Notifiable Data Breach Scheme commences 23 Feb 2018

As of 23 February 2018 a new notifiable data breach scheme (Scheme) will be enacted through legislation amending the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (Privacy Act) making it mandatory for certain entities to notify affected individuals about eligible data breaches.

[Read more…]

Legal issues for data loss

It’s horrible for any organisation to contemplate the possibility of data loss.   Organisations collect and create a variety of data that includes personal, confidential and proprietary information (Intellectual Property).  In many instances, loss of this data can be terminal for the organisation.  Losses can be economic and reputational and can be thought of coming from two (2) distinct sources, external or internal.

[Read more…]

Data Breach Bill 2016 – considerations for data security

Updated 4 April 2017.

In recent times, high profile data breaches such as the 2015 Ashley Madison scandal, which saw the names of up to 900,000 Australian users published online, have shown the type of detriment that can be caused when personal information is compromised by a data breach.  Even icons of the Australian retail sector such as Kmart and David Jones have had customer data lost to hackers in 2015.  One year prior, Optus reported three (3) separate data breaches, with the security of the personal information of over 300,000 of its customers being compromised.  These are just a few instances which highlight the magnitude of the issue in Australia. [Read more…]

Cupid Media risks privacy of the dateless

The Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (Privacy Act) requires entities to take reasonable steps to secure personal information.

[Read more…]

Dundas Lawyers
Street Address Suite 12, Level 9, 320 Adelaide Street Brisbane QLD 4001

Tel: 07 3221 0013

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